Blood sugar versus urine sugar

I have never understood using a highly regulated environment like blood to do high level diagnostics. Not a good place to look for problems.

Blood sugar is what it is – a vector sum of dozens of changing forces, and thus proving dysregulation is not straightforward. A person can fail two fasting sugar tests and a glucose challenge test due to a temporary unhealthy mental state. This mental perturbation may be readily reversible with wise counsel, and thus this high blood sugar is not pathological. Worrying about it and testing blood sugar repeatedly during the day may make things worse – an unfortunate problem that would have resolved now becomes a possible lifelong state that is maintained by fruitless worrying.

Sugar in the urine of a thin, muscular person, particularly when it is more than what one would guess from the blood level. Persistently present, that is a pathological sign, as persistent excretion of sugar in a state of nature would put the individual at a survival disadvantage. But, high urine sugar, obsessively monitored and worried over, may simply make the source, a temporary psychological -or even a temporary physical-problem, a long-lived psychological and physical problem.

Sugar in the urine of an obese, sedentary person with underdeveloped or atrophied musculature probably is expected and is normal, as the high blood sugar has essentially nowhere to go but the liver, which is too small a depot to matter. This sugar in the urine is not itself pathological, though the acceleration in the rate of deposition of fat in the liver may well be the pathology, defining when fat has become too fat.

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